Tag Archives: exhibitions for children

Daily Update: 15 March 2012

Today the power was out from first thing this morning until a little after 5pm. And due to the limited life of my laptop’s battery, I started the day in my notebook (possibly at the pub, where we maybe had lunch).

Without the distraction of the internet (in conjunction with my dead phone battery), I easily completed the final draft of my exhibition proposal (which I’d convinced myself was due tomorrow but, having just checked my diary for something else, is actually due Monday!)

I emailed my thesis supervisor, once the power came back on, about my thesis thoughts. Included the following:

My thesis ideas are heading towards looking at children in galleries (participatory programs, exhibition design, best practice, etc.) and using the NGA, NGV, and QAG as my case studies (relatively easy to visit, significant institutions, varying program structures, etc.) The general ‘question’/‘discussion topic’ I fleshed out before summer school is the following:

Children’s programs and resources at the NGA, NGV, and QAG: best practice, appropriateness of programs and resources, and the involvement of children throughout the institution.

I want to investigate the varying definitions of ‘children,’ what’s working and what’s not, where the institutions differ, how the programs are developed/run, and then try to form some concept of ‘best practice’ for involving children in Australian galleries, etc. and perhaps include some sort of exhibition proposal package as a way of demonstrating how these ideas could be realised by institutions.

Mind Mapping 19.1.2012

We all know I love a good stream of thought dialogue, but that technique was not appropriate for me today when I was brainstorming some thesis topic thoughts. So I turned to (my beloved) mind-mapping:

Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App
My first mind map of the day
The pencil was during a Skype chat with my mum

Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App
Second mind map of the day
Starting to refine my ideas further; working towards a specific topic

Daily Goals Update

After talking with Jenn, I have decided that my current #AcWri goals need to be tweaked a little. I will read two articles a day, but I will also spend time working towards my monthly goal (refining my thesis topic to something more specific). Once I  have gotten approval for my topic, and can start research towards it, I will re-tweak my #AcWri goals.

Scanned Notes 17.1.12

Notes from: Hooper-Greenhill, Eilean. “Learning from Culture: The Importance of the Museums and Galleries Education Program (Phase I) in England.” Curator: The Museum Journal 47, no. 4 (October 2004): 428-449. http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.2151-6952.2004.tb00137.x

Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App
Click thumbnails for full size.

Main point I want to remember
I’m looking at children attending museums* as general visitors, not as school students.

*The term “museum/s” is used in the place of art gallery, gallery, museum, general collecting institution, etc.

The Art of Bird Watching at the NGA

As part of my undergraduate career I created a ‘mock’ exhibition to be held in the NGA’s children’s gallery. This assessment piece was one of three undergrad items I physically stored away for future use (the other two being my Honours thesis journal and a course booklet about collecting, which contained many useful references). And I am now so grateful that  I kept this assessment — it has many small points within it that are bringing forth more ideas with each re-read.

  • Using a smaller kids-orientated (and single themed) exhibition as a ‘gateway’ to the National Collection as a whole
  • Using artworks to explore a broad context in a kid-friendly manner (From this example — what is bird watching [at the gallery]?, what is a bird?, what are feathers?, how do birds fly?, nests and eggs and chicks, birds you can watch, how can you help birds?, activity::a bird you can make) — providing age appropriate materials, as well as further resources for families/schools to use outside of the gallery to continue the learning outcomes of the exhibition
  • Introducing kids to a variety of media used by artists, as well as objects the general public may not consider ‘art’ (or may be viewed as artefacts, etc. depending on definitions produced by institutions)
  • Running public programs in conjunction with the exhibitions in order to further promote the exhibition PLUS art making in general (not to mention using it as a further ‘gateway’ to the gallery)
  • Guided (or self-guided) tour of the gallery as a hide-and-seek style affair — moves children out of the designated gallery and into the institution as a whole >> ‘gateway’
  • Check the aims of institutions re: programs for children (and what are the targeted ages?) >> think about what is my definition of ‘children’?
  • Publications available in connection to children’s art gallery >> how interpreted for use by kids? parents? schools? community groups?
  • Introducing children to a variety of art styles, cultures, mediums, artists, eras
  • Display of a child friendly exhibition = low hung works, etc >> exhibition display
  • Catalogue and textual materials encourage a link between the theme and the art >> creates further interest for viewer
  • Connecting with community [interest] groups in order to widen the appeal of exhibitions
  • Continuously available activity within the gallery space allows children to physically participate within the exhibition, without having to be on site at the specific times of other organised activities
  • The addition of interactive questions within wall labels as a way of guiding children’s viewing of artworks

EDIT

This is exactly me right now, while I am doing prelim reading:


SOURCE

Curating for Kids

I would love for my thesis to be more curatorship based this time. Therefore the idea of researching exhibitions designed for children is appealing to me more and more.

I have been importing articles, related pages, etc. into my Mendeley for future reference >> Google Scholar phrase “curating exhibitions for children”